JOB TITLE: Secretary

JOB SUMMARY:

The Secretary shall perform all clerical duties, maintaining accurate corporate records, and recording minutes of all regular and special meetings of the Board and the Corporation. He or she may be assisted in this task by the Executive Director and other administrative staff.

EDUCATION, EXPERIENCE AND TRAINING:

  • Undergraduate degree or G.E.D required, two to five years of experience in management or non-profit organizations.
  • The ability to take knowledge and transform it into exciting and useful messages and disseminate it to the right audiences through the best distribution channels is critical.
  • Understanding and commitment to abide by the 501 (c) (3) Exemption of the Internal Revenue Code.
  • Must demonstrate excellent interpersonal and coaching skills. Also, must have computer skills in a Microsoft Office, Excel, Slack and Dropbox.

QUALIFICATIONS: 

Must be self-motivated, dependable and flexible. Sincere commitment to work collaboratively with all constituent groups, including staff, board members, volunteers, donors, program participants, and other supporters.  Self-starter, able to work independently, and entrepreneurial; enjoys creating and implementing new initiatives. Excellent organizational skills with the ability to handle multiple tasks simultaneously are required. Understanding of and commitment to the Foundation’s mission, goals and bylaws.

SUPERVISED BY:

Executive Director

EMPLOYMENT VARIABLES:

Must be available to communicate with the Board 8 hours per day, seven days per week, except on holidays and requested days off.

GENERAL RESPONSIBILITIES:

  • Communication: The secretary of the corporation is an active conduit for communication between the board, management, and members, by giving proper notice of any meetings and timely distribution of materials such as agendas and meeting minutes. The secretary should be knowledgeable of the organization’s records and related materials and should be able to provide advice and resources to the board on relevant topics at issue, such as particular governance matters being addressed at a meeting or a new amendment to state corporate law. The secretary should aim to be helpful to the board as they discharge their fiduciary duties.
  • Scheduling and Notices: The secretary is tasked with knowing and complying with notice requirements and scheduling meetings to accommodate the directors. Notice requirements can be particularly important and should be complied accurately and appropriately, as improper notice can open the organization up to challenge. The secretary is responsible for scheduling board meetings and should ensure an adequate number of meetings are held per year, in accordance with the organization’s bylaws. Generally, a board can more efficiently and effectively hold a board meeting when the secretary prepares and sends meeting materials far enough in advance of the meeting for each director to review such materials, correct any errors, and prepare questions and comments.
  • Minutes: The secretary is also charged with recording minutes of meetings. Minutes are an      important organizational document and provide a memorialized chronology of key information such as board actions, elections of officers or directors, and certain reports from committees and staff. Meeting minutes can have vital legal significance in an IRS examination and as evidence in courts if, for example, someone challenges the validity of certain actions or positions. The secretary should be well-equipped to record accurate minutes and be aware and sensitive to any special or confidential information discussed at a meeting.
  • Corporate Records: As the custodian of the organization’s records, the secretary is responsible for maintaining accurate documentation and meeting legal requirements, such as annual filing deadlines. It may be helpful for the secretary to have a calendar of filing deadlines, which may include a filing with the corporation’s Secretary of State, the Attorney General, the state tax agency, and the IRS. The secretary is responsible for reviewing and updating documents as necessary and ensuring all documents are safely stored and readily accessible for inspection by directors and/or members. Additionally, it is required that a nonprofit’s exemption application and past three annual returns with the IRS are available for public inspection.

The secretary position has wide-ranging responsibilities, requiring much more than simply being present at all board meetings. These duties likely will increase if the corporation has a voting membership structure, which requires additional notice procedures and voting. Each board should carefully consider how the secretary can best serve their organization.

The above statements reflect the general duties considered necessary to describe the principle functions of the job as identified and shall not be considered as a detailed description of all the work requirements that may be inherent in the position.

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JOB TITLE: Chief Financial Officer

JOB SUMMARY:

The Chief Financial Officer shall serve as chairman of the Finance Committee. He/She is responsible for setting up the accounting and recording system, overseeing its operation, and handling the organization’s daily financial matters as well as the financial matters of special events. The Chief Financial Officer works with the Executive Director on financial matters pertaining to the office, with the Secretary on bookkeeping matters, and with the Government Affairs Officer on any necessary tax filings.

EDUCATION, EXPERIENCE AND TRAINING:

  • Undergraduate degree required, preferably a CPA (Certified Public Accountant). Three to five years of experience in management or non-profit organization. Develop and enforce strong internal controls and financial management policies
  • The ability to ensure accurate and complete financial reporting and proper maintenance of financial records and information/tax returns
  • Regularly assess risks and whether and how such risks should be mitigated
  • Keep a calendar of filing requirements and deadlines and have clear assignments (with backups) to help ensure they are all met in a timely manner
  • Have the organization’s financials audited whenever required or advisable understanding and commitment to abide by the 501 (c) (3) Exemption of the Internal Revenue Code.
  • Must demonstrate excellent interpersonal and coaching skills. Also, must have computer skills in a Microsoft Office, Excel, Slack and Dropbox.

QUALIFICATIONS: 

Must be self-motivated, dependable and flexible. Sincere commitment to work collaboratively with all constituent groups, including staff, board members, volunteers, donors, program participants, and other supporters.  Self-starter, able to work independently, and entrepreneurial; enjoys creating and implementing new initiatives. Excellent organizational skills with the ability to handle multiple tasks simultaneously are required. Understanding of and commitment to the Foundation’s mission, goals and bylaws.

SUPERVISED BY:

Executive Director

EMPLOYMENT VARIABLES:

Must be available to communicate with the Board 8 hours per day, seven days per week, except on holidays and requested days off.

GENERAL RESPONSIBILITIES:

  • Financial management and/or oversight. The Chief Financial Officer may manage or oversee the management of the financial affairs of the organization, often including such basic tasks as selecting a bank, reconciling bank statements, and managing cash flow. He/she should be knowledgeable about who has access to the organization’s funds and any outstanding bills or debts owed. The Chief Financial Officer should create and maintain systems for ensuring the organization’s ongoing solvency and oversee the development of the organization’s financial policies. Helpful policies to consider include check signing authority, expense reimbursement, credit card usage, and petty cash policies, if applicable.
  • Budgets. The Chief Financial Officer may be responsible for preparing, or facilitating the preparation of an annual budget, as well as regularly monitoring and comparing the actual revenues and expenses incurred against such budget. The development of a budget that supports the organization’s goals and drives decision-making is an important part of an organization’s success in effectuating its mission. The budget should be reviewed and approved by the board, however, the Chief Financial Officer should be prepared to explain and justify the document.
  • Reports. The Chief Financial Officer should have thorough knowledge and understanding of the organization’s financial reports and important financial ratios. He/she should keep the board apprised of key financial events, trends, and concerns, and her assessments of the organization’s fiscal health. He/she is also generally responsible for completing, or ensuring the completion of, required financial reporting forms (including the IRS Form 990) in a timely manner and making these forms available for the board’s review.
  • Financial Liaison. A skilled Chief Financial Officer should be able to translate financial concepts and information for board members who do not have financial backgrounds or substantial financial experience. He/she should spend time learning the of the organization’s finances and the applicable laws, which may include laws related to earned income, the unrelated business income tax, appropriate expenditures, and prudent investments. He/she can be most effective to the board when facilitating and encouraging the board’s strategic thinking about the short- and long-term financial vitality of the organization in relation to its advancement of the organization’s mission.

The above statements reflects the general duties considered necessary to describe the principle functions of the job as identified and shall not be considered as a detailed description of all the work requirements that may be inherent in the position.